Classroom Projects

As an artist I feel it's important to give back to the community whenever possible, but as a First Nations artist I believe that it is important to educate the youth of today with authentic knowledge and experiences so that real reconciliation can take place between the Indigenous (Onkwehón:we) and the non-indigenous people of Turtle Island.

 

 

 

 

 

These are some of the things I have done in the classroom.

  • FNMI Conference 2018 Workshops – Grade 10
  • Quest 2017 Indigenous Artist working with ET Crowle PS 2017
  • ET Crowle PS – 2017. FNMI based art classes for grades 6-8
  • 5 Day Art Class based on FNMI thoughts – Grade 10 & 12 Keswick High School 2017
  • Traditional oral stories. (Although I am NOT a traditional Storyteller in the FN sense. This is a sacred role for which I have not been gifted. I am simply a person that tells the stories he has been given.)
  • Spoke candidly on FN issues and culture as the class required. (Grades 7-12)
  • Guest participant within an after school program that read and discussed the book “Fatty Legs”. Provided age appropriate answers relating to residential schools within a sharing circle. (grades 4-6)
  • Provided one off, 60-90 minute art classes.
  • Guest Artist Unionville HS & Huron Heights HS; First Nations Art Inquiry project. This project encompassed one full school year culminating in a student Art Show in Aurora ON - 2017.
  • 8 week art program based on First Nation culture and Woodland Style art. (Grade 7 & 8)
  • Traditional oral story interpretation through art; 8 week program. (Grade 7)
  • Facilitated a number of student designed wall murals. 8 weeks of class + mural time. Students aquire a deeper understanding of FN culture through storytelling and discussion.
  • Grade 9 English – discussed the “Power of Words” and traditional oral story telling.
  • Grade 11/12 Drama – Origin Stories
  • Art at Park - FN stories, art and community as a way of supporting grade 6 learning.

 

Below are some examples of classes that I have been given the opportunity to either lead or participate. Most of these photos were taken from various school board tweets.

 

 

StoneBridge PS (Dec 2017)


I teach line, color and design using a variety of indigenous art styles with traditional oral stories as inspiration. I bring indigenous culture to students who have never met an indigenous person before. I like to think I am making a difference.

Grade 8

 

 

Keswick High School (Oct 2017)

"All My Relations"
Visual Arts through Indigenous ways of learning.

Grade 10 & 12

 

 

Keswick High School (Oct 2017)

"The Old Ones"
Grade 12

This Indigenous themed art project relates to the difficult and often overlooked task of "seeing" rather than simply "looking" at an object. This important skill is part of the artist’s mental toolbox, and allows the artist to capture more than the likeness of a person or thing, but also the "essence". With the use of the “old ones” I teach my students respect for Mother Earth as well as, I hope, the ability to “see” the minute details of light, shadow and texture.

The ability of students to really experience what is around them in the physical world is being lost as they plug into an electronic world that invades every aspect of their senses. They look without seeing and experience nothing unless it can be found within the confines of their phone or electronic devices.

E.T.Crowle Public School

YRDSB QUEST 2017

Grade 5 & 6

This was a six class program in which I would spent half a day with the students to first teach them about Indigenous culture in general, then my Kanien'keha:ka culture in particular through discussion and traditional oral storytelling. After which time we started the design process based on a selected traditional story. It was decided to base this year's paintings off the story of "Hiawatha and the Peacemaker" as written by the famous Mohawk song writer and musican (The Band) Robbie Robertson from Six Nations Mohawk Territory in Brantford Ontario. We decided to go this route since this oral story takes 12 days to recite and I am far from qualified to tell this tradtional Haudenosaunee story in all it's glory and detail.

 

 

KAIROS BLANKET EXERCISE (Oct 2017)

Markham District High School, grade 9
Click an image to expand.

 

 

 

 

Artist in residence (2017)

The Artist in Residence program brings into the classroom, professional artists to work with a class or classes for a entire week. In the case of this particular project, I worked with a Grade 8 class in the mornning and a Grade 7 class in the afternoon. Like all my programs, I integrate First Nations culture and oral storytelling into my lessons.

After an introduction and project explanation, I told a traditonal oral story which I then then broke into sections. I feel that it is important to "tell" the story in a traditional manner so that the students experience an "authentic" telling that they can later incorporate into their art. Once complete each panel can be mounted sequentially to pictorially retell the story.

Below are selected samples of the panels which are 3.5 feet wide and 5 feet tall. The grade 8 class was responsible for the first 6 panels, whereas the grade 7 students tackled the last 6 panels.

Top Three - Grade 8 & Bottom 3 - Grade 7

 

 

 

Grade 12 First Nations Art Inquiry (2016)

 

Bill Fisch Forest Stewardship and Education Centre

Nature walk in a snow storm
- there's a funny story here...

Sharing Circle - Discussing FN culture and Art
Students at work
Student work based on what we learned that day


Grade 11 First Nations Art Inquiry (2016)

 

   


Leading a nature walk, from behind :-)



Grade 12 FN Art INQUIRY

The following photos are a continuation of the project which started in 2016 with the grade 12 class from Unionville High School. We did these in April, and were destined to be shown on May 3 at the Aurora Cultural Centre. With such a short deadline, you can imagine that the students and teacher were pushing hard to get this competed on time.

Working with 4 other Indigenous artists we tried to immerse the students in as much cultural experience as possible. This included exposure to our art, traditional oral stories and culture. I am please to say that 3 out of the 4 sculptures depicted below seem to be a result of my telling of the Sky-Woman story. Although this could be a loose translation on my part. One depicts a woman holding a pregnant belly (Sky-Woman), a pair of hands hold a turtle shell with a muskrat swimming upwards, and a goose swept up by a whirl wind of air coming in for a landing. Each will incorporate glass as well as wood.

I would like to stress that we (the NDN artists) acted as inspiration and did perhaps give a little guidance during the design process ( I also contributed a small amount of carving to the goose’s wings), but most of the talent and hard work must be attributed to the students themselves, as well as Shane; the chainsaw welding teacher (who should be considered a true artist in his own right) from Unionville High School.

 

 


 

 



Grade 8 Art Class (Woodland Style)

 

As a traditional oral storyteller and artist, Deron uses stories as a way of engaging student’s minds and hearts, he then helps to make connections to the art with these stories. Selecting the Woodland style art form for its step-by-step methodology, Deron was able to take his students from a relative state of indigenous ignorance to a position of relative comfort. It all began with the “story”.


 



StoneBridge PUBLIC SCHOOL

First Nations Mural Project

Characters for the mural were based on our Woodland Style paintings that we created in a previous class. I then took these characters and incorporated them into an overall design. Adding a background that would highlight the students work, and create an overall pleasing theme.

 



Grade 7 Art Class
(oral story interpretation through art)




 

Adrienne Clarkson Public School

First Nations Mural Project

As with most of my programs, this class started with an introduction to First Nations culture and ended with a traditional oral story. Using that story as inspiration, the students created a number of "characters" that would later be used for a wall mural. Being an 8 week program I was able to include additional art lessons on shape, form and line as well as pallet selection. And as I normally do I included more First Nations culture such as the Mohawk language.

This is an example of some of the final designs from ONE of my classes. At Adrienne Clarkson there were 75 students making up a total of three grade 8 classes.

The Initial Design

The orignal intent was to take the best 3 designs from each class and to create an integrated mural. I originally started doing this and was able to fit 4 from each class into the mural on the left. However, I found it very difficult to ignore the other GREAT work created and decided to include a second mural on the right. This is an ambitious project when you consider we will be starting the first week of June and only have 3 weeks to complete both murals. The plan is to have the students complete 90% of the work.

The Final Mural (above two images)



 

Grade 8 Social Studies
& Art Class

 

This program was a little different in that I was given the opportunity to help teach the entire unit on First Nations culture and eventual European contact. I worked with the teacher in a tag-team arrangement where I provided additonal information to help fill in different areas, gave an Indigenous point of view, and brought things to the discussions that normally would not be included. The culmination of this knowledge was expressed with arcylic on canvas and a celebration at the end that included fry bread!

I will forever be grateful to Ms. White for giving me the opportunity to do this. I found it a great learning experience and I personally feel that these students went away with not only a historical sense of FN culture, but an understanding of the issues and priorities of FN people today.



Coyote Boy: An original Trickster Story

Coyote Boy is currently being used in a number of elementary school classrooms in Southern Ontario as well as the Northern Cheyenne Reservation School in Montana USA, and is available from Goodminds.com. It was also selected for the 2016 - First Nation Communities Read - Recommendation List

The photo to the left/below shows the classroom bulletin board from Northern Cheyenne Reservation School.

In June 2017, Coyote Boy was performed as a stage play by the grade 5s of Stonebridge Public School, Markham, Ontario.